Dr. William Walter Flora, DDS

November 23, 1871 - November 10, 1922

(Readers may find it helpful referring to books concerning frontier history in Kansas, once known as the 'Great Desert', during mid-nineteenth century, for a refreshed perspective of life endured by pioneering farmers such as our Flora families.)

WILLIAM (Will) WALTER FLORA was born Thursday, 23 November 1871, so wrote his brother-in-law, Carl R Gray, 22 June 1933 in a genealogical research report for Will's daughter, Harriette Pearl (Flora) Hopkins.

Birth was in Kansas, he was married in 1892, became a dentist in 1896, had two daughters while living at Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, moved to Colorado Springs in 1904 and expired at daughter's Pueblo, Colorado home Friday morning, 10 November 1922, of "Chronic Nephritic", days before fifty-first birthday, burial 12 November, Evergreen Cemetery, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Will's birth, more than likely at parent's farm in Liberty Township, Montgomery County, Kansas. --- if (?) birth was not in Montgomery County it probably was one hundred miles north-northwest in Lyon County, in area which before 1873 was Kansa Indian country, county Carl Gray's report said Mary Elizabeth died Monday, 9 November 1874 for which we find NO other documentation.

Will's parents were John Andrew Flora (1845 IN-1934 KS) and Mary Elizabeth Shults (1851 OH-1874 KS), Carl Gray's report said, a great granddaughter of Colonel Heinrich Staring (1730 NY-1818 NY), a Revolutionary War veteran and Elizabeth Kast, --- united Sunday, 10 February 1867 in Lyon (Breckenridge till Feburary1862) County, Kansas (created January 1861) by "Minister of the Gospel, S G Elliott".

Carl's wife, Harriette A Flora, as told by their first great, granddaughter Sandra Stuart Gray, so shared 8/12/05:

"Harriette (Hattie A) often told the story of being called into her mother's bedroom as she lay dying to kiss her goodbye. She said she was four at the time. She climbed up on her bed to do so, and lay with her awhile...."

We learned Mary and daughter Jennie G were buried at Americus Cemetery in Lyon County when a photograph of their gravestone was taken and sent me by Sara Murphy of Lyon County Historical Archives, with
inscription:

"MARY E. WIFE OF JOHN A. FLORA
BORN June 20, 1851 DIED Nov. 9, 1874
Infant Daughter Jennie G Aged 1 Month"

BUT, location and death date of one month old sister Jennie G and why they are buried here remain two big, undocumented, mysteries. ----

NOTE; Will's father is recorded in household #188, Verdigris Township.  Montgomery County on June 1870 Federal and in household #25 in March 1875 State (Liberty Township) census. The later has Will, Clarence &
Hattie in their maternal grandmother's household #14 following November 1874 death of their mother, her fourth known child, Mary Elizabeth.

Their father was remarried by Reverend F R Morton, of seven year old First Presbyterian Church in Parsons, Labette (1st Dorn, then Neosho) County, Kansas, Thursday, 24 October 1878, to a widow with two surviving children, moving to Oswego leaving Will, the youngest, to live with his grandmother till "early manhood", ca 1885.

Earlier, the Floras and Conrads made friends with and each had obtained a 160 acre tract of land from the Osage Indians, later having to pay U S Government $1.25/acre for their land.

These farms were:

1)- until January 1871 in Verdigris Township,

2)- until September 1870 on Osage Indian Ceded Land before treaty of Drum Creek, with the Conrad's furnishing beef for the celebration, treaty resulting from a long running battle with the railroads over these lands in Washington City ending July 1870, under Ulysses S. Grant, our eighteenth President (1869-1877), --- land being a three mile strip east of Verdigris River (named thusly by Lieutenant Zebulon M. Pike in 1806 because he observed Indians removing green clay from its banks for painting their faces), separated from Osage Indian Territory (Osage men were typically six to seven feet tall), created 2 June 1825, with its 3,600 Indians and

3)- until Thursday, 3 June 1869 in Wilson County, organized in 1855.  County originally extended to the south line of Kansas, and was named in honor of Colonel Hiero T. Wilson who lived in Fort Scott from September, 1843.

 

KANSAS HISTORICAL MARKER

IN MAY, 1863, A MOUNTED PARTY OF ABOUT TWENTY CONFEDERATES, NEARLY ALL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, SET OUT FROM MISSOURI TO RECRUIT TROOPS IN THE WEST. SEVERAL MILES EAST OF HERE THEY WERE CHALLENGED BY LOYAL OSAGE INDIANS. IN A RUNNING FIGHT TWO CONFEDERATES WERE KILLED AND THE OTHERS WERE SURROUNDED ON A GRAVEL BAR IN THE VERDIGRIS RIVER ABOUT THREE MILES NORTH OF THIS MARKER. IGNORING A FLAG OF SURRENDER, THE OSAGES SCALPED AND CUT THE HEADS OFF ALL BUT TWO OF THE PARTY. THESE, WOUNDED, HID UNDER THE RIVER BANK AND ESCAPED. AFTER THE WAR WHEN SETTLERS BEGAN STAKING CLAIMS ON THE OSAGE RESERVATION, CONGRESS AUTHORIZED REMOVAL OF THE TRIBE TO PRESENT OKLAHOMA. IN 1870 A TREATY WAS SIGNED IN A GROVE ON DRUM CREEK, THREE MILES SOUTHEAST.  IRONICALLY, THE CHEAP LANDS TO WHICH THE OSAGES WERE REMOVED BECAME A GREAT OIL FIELD AND FOR A TIME THEY WERE THE WEALTHIEST PEOPLE PER CAPITA IN THE WORLD.

"For years farming in Kansas was carried on under the greatest difficulty, and few people believed that the frontier would ever extend much beyond the longitude of Topeka. But the pioneers were not daunted, step by step, mile by mile, year by year, they advanced upon the "Great Desert," until now the state is under cultivation practically to, and in some districts beyond, the 100th meridian [Dodge City, state line is 102nd]." -- 1912, Frank W Blackmar)

Montgomery County Seat of Government, according to history books, was:

1st)- Verdigris City, Verdigris Township, In the beginning Verdigris City is said to have had about 50 people, located on west half, northwest quarter, section 22, township 33 south, range 16 east, reportedly Henry Wilford Conrad's (1845 IN-1928 KS) farm, (Handbook of the Kansas Legislature, 1901, Topeka : Crane & Co, 1900), states "Came to Kansas in 1868. He was one of the first four settlers of Montgomery County, Kansas.", so proclaimed by fifth Governor of Kansas, James Madison Harvey, as provisional County Seat Thursday, 3 June 1869 for newly created, (now) 646 square mile, Montgomery County, carved from 1855 created Wilson County, named for General Richard Montgomery who shouted "Death or Liberty" in Revolutionary battle where he died.

Henry's farm was next to Will's father, Henry's United Brethren, Hartsville University (Indiana) schoolmate's farm, both veterans of the Civil War, John Andrew Flora, John's other neighbor was five foot seven inch, blue eyed brother Daniel Rice Boon Flora (1838 IN-1908 CO).  (Will's grandfather, Rev John Flora (1800 GER-1876 IN) was five foot six and half inches tall with blue eyes, busy raising a second family in Bartholomew County, Indiana)

2nd)- Liberty, Verdigris Township, when in fall 1869 Verdigris City merged with Montgomery City to create Town of Liberty becoming County Seat,

3rd)- Independence, Independence Township, after a hotly contested election November 1870 when Independence [once the wealthiest per capita town in United States] was chosen by the people as County Seat.

"The site of Independence was bought from the Indians by George A. Brown in September, 1869 [month Will's sister Hattie A Flora was born as 1st white child in Montgomery, County], before the land had been acquired by the government." (1912, Frank W. Blackmar) Independence was created six miles northerly of Liberty on west bank of river.

"During the winter of 1869, the banks of the Verdigris [river] were alive with camps and campers. Families spent the winter, living in covered wagons or in huts constructed of hay.", so wrote Cutler in his 1883 publication. Population exploded from a hand full in 1867 to 7,564 in 1870, 13,017 in 1875, 18,213 in 1880, 49,475 in 1910 but only 36,252 in 2000 and the river at state line, is lowest elevation in Kansas at 680 feet above sea level!

Verdigris Township was altered and renamed Liberty in January 1871, later Town of Liberty moved a few miles east to new railroad which started operations January 1872.

FAMILY & LIFE: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Will had an older brother Clarence Morton (1868 KS-1924 OK) whose first wife's cousin he married, and who, with family, attended Will's oldest daughter's wedding in 1920 but strangely, is not noted in Will's 1922 obituary and sister Harriette Amanda (Hattie A) (1869 KS-1956 ME), she was first white child born in Montgomery County according to Cutler's 1883 written history who likewise attended his oldest daughter's wedding with family, less her oldest married son, Carl R Gray, Jr and is noted in Will's obituary.

   We discovered Will had a second sister, Jennie G, lived but one month. Birth, death dates and locations unknown! She may (?), have been born a twin (?) or, ---- maybe (?) while Mary visited her mother in Lyon County, Kansas late 1870 or early 1871 as third child (before Will's November 1871 birth), buried in Americus Cemetery, Lyon County where her mother lived in household #79 in 1865, before marriage, possibly (?) where Mary's father and/or little brother Henry was/were buried, in now unmarked grave(s). Jennie's death may (?) have been what caused Mary's mother Harriet to move south one-hundred miles to Montgomery County in 1871, then when Mary died [Monday], 9 November 1874, reportedly in Lyon County by Carl Gray in 1933, a son-in-law, husband of daughter who laid with her in death. At age twenty-three, her body was interned with daughter, Jennie G or ---- (??) when was she born and buried, maybe (?) last born and possibly causing mother's death? WHY else is she buried in Americus Cemetery??? John enlisted under Captain Thomas C Hill ten years earlier, October 1864, during civil war, who later was on Americus Cemetery Board.

His uncle, Daniel Rice Boon Flora, lived next door till moving in 1875 to the high country of Colorado Territory with his family (Daniel's wife was a younger sister of Wolney's wife), also uncle Wolney Pulaski "VP" Flora (1834 IN-1909 KS) followed west after Sunday, 28th of November wedding in is home of oldest daughter, Wilhelmina (Wilma) Isidora (1857 IN-1937 KS), to Henry Wilford Conrad, by Rev J H Vancleave, they living their lives in Montgomery County. Two of Will's three aunts married brothers and moved to Missouri(ah), Josephine
(Flora) Beauchamp (1833 IN-1915 KS), Livingston County, later moving to and died in Johnson County, Kansas and Margaret Anna (Flora) Beauchamp (1841 IN-1926 MO), in Worth County. Third aunt, Sarah Catherine (Flora)
Muth (1836 IN-1877 KS), moved to Franklin County, Kansas.

   These three German Indiana born Flora brothers fought during Civil War (along with Buffalo Bill Cody & others), just south from where Lieutenant Zebulon M. Pike entered in 1806 what now was Kansas, near Mine Creek, Linn County, Kansas, October 1864, defeating Gen Sterling Price, CSA. An engagement where one ex and five future state Governors were fighting, ie: Price having been Governor of Missouri twice (1853-57); John L Beveridge, IL, Samuel Crawford, KS, T T Crittenden, MO, John S Marmaduke, MO, and Thomas Moonlight, WY, while General William L Cabell became a six term Mayor of Dallas, TX, and where Confederate Generals Marmaduke and Cabell were captured.

 

KANSAS HISTORICAL MARKER

IN OCTOBER, 1864, A CONFEDERATE ARMY UNDER GEN. STERLING PRICE WAS DEFEATED NEAR KANSAS CITY. HE RETREATED SOUTH, CROSSED INTO KANSAS, AND CAMPED AT TRADING POST. EARLY ON THE MORNING OF OCTOBER 25 UNION TROOPS UNDER GENERALS PLEASONTON, BLUNT AND CURTIS FORCED HIM FROM THIS POSITION, AND A FEW HOURS LATER THE BATTLE OF MINE CREEK WAS FOUGHT OVER THESE FIELDS. CONFEDERATE FORCES WERE THROWN INTO CONFUSION AS THEY TRIED TO CROSS THE STEEP, SLIPPERY BANKS OF THE STREAM. IN THE CLOSE FIGHTING ON THE BOTTOMS HUNDREDS OF REBEL SOLDIERS WERE CAPTURED, INCLUDING GENERAL MARMADUKE, WHO WAS TAKEN BY A 20-YEAR-OLD PRIVATE. ALTHOUGH UNION FORCES MISSED A CHANCE TO DESTROY PRICE'S ARMY THE DEFEAT WAS DECISIVE ENOUGH TO END THE THREAT OF A REBEL INVASION OF KANSAS. ABOUT 25,000 MEN WERE ENGAGED, MORE THAN IN ANY OTHER KANSAS BATTLE.

The Ingall's of now famous "Little House on the Prairie" fame, settled just west across Verdigris River, on Diminished Reserves of Osage Indians, remaining about a year, where little Carrie Ingall was born August 1870, year before Will. The replica of Ingall's house is most likely typical of other earlier Montgomery County farm homes, such as the Flora and Conrad families, except the John Flora house may (?) have had a bedroom.

During those earlier years, in addition to many natural hardships, were: 130 Kansas settlers slaughtered by Indians in 1867, in Montgomery County, a horrendous prairie fire occurred in 1868 when the night sky was said to be bright enough to read a book 1-mile away, the 1874 infestation of grasshoppers and the great flood of 1885 but, as pioneers, our FLORA family survived most hardships of prairie living.

   Strange to me, while Clarence and Hattie moved to Oswego, Labette County, Kansas October 1878 with their father, new step-mother Adda (Crawford) Smith (1844 IN-1913 KS), her son Peter (ca 1865 IL-xxxx) and daughter Linnie (1868 KS-1947 CO), --- Will is raised for eleven years until "early manhood", thirty miles west near Liberty in Montgomery County by his maternal grandmother, Harriet Catherine (Sterling) Shults (1824 NY-1905 KS), following death of his Ohio born mother. Harriet's obituary said she moved from Lyon County in "1871" to Montgomery County, [less John Marsh, her 2nd (1868) hubby, and without "Marsh" surname] with her son George E, seventh child of eight known children and servant Ettie Grubb, relocating to near 'new' Town of Liberty, by new 1871 railroad, 11-miles north from Indian Territory (since November 1907, Oklahoma), --- on property listed between household's of her sixth born Elige (Elijah?) with wife Libbie and her first born, civil war veteran John with wife Clara. --- Her fifth born, Sarah, married Deputy Sheriff Clarence Scranton in Independence Township. She lived with daughter from 1885 till her Sunday, 20 August 1905 death near grandson's, Clarence Morton Flora, home with Will in attendance at her death and funeral, buried with her daughter's family in Mount Hope Cemetery.

Will moved to his father's Oswego home, Condon Hotel, before 1885 State census,

"When circuses play little towns in Kansas and go away leaving their 'tanbark rings stamped on the prairie, the town youngsters bring in their ponies and try to duplicate the Daring Feats of Horsemanship they have just witnessed. At least that is what they did in the early 1880s and among the girls of small Oswego, Kans. who would try backflips and pick-up-the-handkerchief was an extremely pretty, darkhaired girl named Harriette Flora.", Time Magazine, May 3, 1937, at age 13 and reportedly was enrolled in a Presbyterian school.  Its questionable how well he knew his brother, sister, step-brother and step-sister after having been raised since not yet age three with last six or seven formative years, thirty miles west with other children. Hattie's future husband, Carl Gray, boarded at Flora's operated Condon Hotel until promoted and transferred to Wichita, who comforted him during his mother's lingering cancerous illness till her 17 August 1886 death. Monday morning, 6 December 1886 sister Hattie, barely seventeen, married barely nineteen y/o, Carl R Gray (1867AR-1939DC) of the Frisco RR, moving west to Wichita (see page 479, volume I, "Who was who in America"). ("Celebrated") Both of Carl's parents were born on Maine's coast, but were Arkansas pioneering school teachers since 1860, he with the south during Civil War, she a talented artist and diary writer, Colonel Oliver Crosby and Virginia LaFayette (Davis) Gray.

"Mrs H C Shults" (grandmother Harriet Catherine) attended Will's wedding with 1877 orphaned, Maude Wallick (1870 IN-1940 CO) (name misspelled "Wallock" on license and "Wallack" in newspapers), --- born, Monday, 21 March 1870 in Peru, Miami County, Indiana, d/o Anna Elizabeth Hagee (1840 PA-1877 IN) and Captain William F M Wallick (1842OH-1873IN), ----Maude then from Chicago, Illinois, married in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, Sunday, 21 August 1892, service performed by Reverend William S Knight, D D, the Presbyterian church minister and its high school & college's President. Also attending were; "Mr & Mrs. J.A. Flora" (father & step-mother), "Mr and Mrs C.R. Gray" (sister, Hattie A and Carl) and Maude's and Alice Kingsbury's aunt, "Mrs L E Carrier" (Elmira (Wallick) Carrier (1842 OH-1901 MI).

It would appear Maude may (?) have moved after 1880 census from Peru, Indiana, possibly to Oswego before going to Chicago area about 1890/1 where she likely (?) lived with her aunt Elmira.

Their wedding (requiring his father's consent) took place thirteen days following the Oswego funeral of Maude's friend and first cousin, Alice (Kingsbury) Flora, first wife of Will's brother Clarence.

The Presbyterianism in his life is puzzling to say the least!  Presbyterian schools were being created in the 1880s. A young girls school in Oswego operated from January 1886 to 1901, but none near found for boys except at Carthage, Missouri. ----- His grandmother, from New York, wed in Ohio where 1st seven of eight known children were born, raised Will after mother's 1874 death till 1885, was Methodist, his father, thou a Methodist from early life, was given final words by a Presbyterian minister, most likely because of his step-daughter who had looked after him his last twenty-one years, till 1934, his step-mother, Addie, was given last rites in 1913 by a Baptist minister, but her daughter, Linnie, Will's step-sister , was Presbyterian, her mother, his step-mother's sister & husband. the Shipleys (whose only son, Monnie, was a conductor for Frisco RR) were Baptist.

Will & Maude were devout Methodist in Carthage and Colorado Springs, his sister was Baptist, brother Presbyterian, and they are married by a Presbyterian minister. His 1918 published biography in "History of Colorado", says he attended Presbyterian school --- and further is printed, he was a well liked professor when teaching after graduation, supposedly in Kansas City's Western Dental College which itself had a Methodist background.

May I suggest: ---- He was sent to Carthage, Missouri for school where he became acquainted with Reverend Knight, who later served in uniting him in marriage, where later, between 1890 and 1898 his sister Hattie A lived. In 1889 while living in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas her sister-in-law, Ethel Davis Gray (1871 AR-1910 IL) of Fayetteville, Washington county, Arkansas, attended the Wichita Presbyterian Lewis Academy. ---- A Presbyterian high school and junior college had been started in Carthage, Friday night, 17 September 1886, with Reverend William S Knight the initial college President, first, in an addition at 700 block of Grant street church, later the Carthage Collegiate Institute (1899-1908) built their imposing four story brick structure in 1400 block of south Main street, constructed by George Brown Wood (1852 VA-1941 MO), younger brother to my paternal great grandmother, Sarah E (Wood) Boggess (1835 VA-1918 MO), ---after the city closed Lyon Street for school use (where Mark Twain grade school was built in 1917 which I attended 1932 through 1940). I also suspicion (?) that this might be the college in which grandfather Flora taught under the minister who united he and Maude August 1892, not in a college one-hundred & fifty miles north at Kansas City and not for eleven years, maybe till 1904.

Carl Raymond Gray (1867AR-1939DC) was promoted to division superintendent for the Frisco RR (became vice-chairman of Union Pacific RR on 70th birthday (1937), see page 74, 26 April 1937, Time magazine), reportedly lived in Carthage 1890 to 1898 with wife (Will's sister) Harriette Amanda (Flora), (1869 KS-1956 ME), selected by the Golden Rule Foundation, "American Mother of 1937", same year presented "Cross of Honor" of U S Flag Association, three y/o son Carl R Jr, (1889 KS-1955 MN), later an army Major General (head of military railroads in Africa and Europe, WW II), followed Missourian, 5-star General-of-the-Army, Omar N Bradley as "Administrator of Veteran Affairs" 1948-1953, for Harry Truman (Time Magazine, 01 December 1947), ---- when Will and Maude were wed with sister, Pearle, not noted in attendance.

Will & Maude's first home, reported in newspaper, was Oswego where they met, she then had been living in Chicago area, likely with her aunt, he employed by I R Fisher at the grocery store, whose daughter, Lucy, attended the wedding. "Will" was president in 1891 and 1892 of Oswego's Young Men's Christian Association (Y M C A) according to writings of Honorable Judge Nelson Case, its first president.

Maude gave birth October 1893 to Harriette Pearl (1893 MO-1973 CO) and August 1898 to my mother Frances Elizabeth (1898 MO-1928 MO) in Carthage.

The new and still in use (2008), impressive Jasper County's $100,000 Court House building was built with Carthage stone (as was later, the Missouri State Capitol building) starting 1894, finished following year.

Will is reported a 1896 graduate of Western Dental College of Kansas City, Missouri, created 1891 now University of Missouri College of Dentistry, K C, was president of Carthage's Y M C A in 1897 (for several years), involved with the Chautauqua assembly and living on Howard Avenue June 11, 1898 when nine y/o nephew Carl R Gray, Jr fell out of their Cherry tree when his mother dropped him off for her trip to Monett to find a house to live in (her repeated comment shared by husband of second granddaughter, Robert C Knutson, MD, 03/10/08 was;

"I moved 52 times in 50 years"), -- when Maude was seven months pregnant with her second daughter, my mother, Frances Elizabeth (1898-1928).

They built their new house some time after December 1898 at 1216 south Main (former numbering). According to newspaper articles Maude and the girls went to Colorado June 1902 and October 1903, and maybe other times, before moving to Colorado Springs in 1904.

Granddaddy Flora's life again becomes confused by historical writings. When did they move from Carthage to Colorado Springs? After cogitating the following I believe they moved in 1904.

1)- His 1922 obituary says 1900, yet they are documented in Carthage beyond 1900.

2)- The "El Paso County Odontological Society" have him as one of eight charter members when formed Thursday, 15 May 1902, with his partner and pallbearer, Dr William K Sinton President, however lists eighteen, which may (?) have been membership at 1st annual meeting of Friday, 15 October 1904. --- yet a Carthage newspaper article of Wednesday 25 June 1902 has grandmother and girls going to Colorado, he to Jefferson City, Missouri for a dental meeting, then back home.

3)- Its reported in 1918 published "History of Colorado", in his biography page 843, that "Dr. William Walter Flora" moved family to Colorado in 1904 (his 1922 obituary said "1900", however, they were documented in Carthage, but not found in 1900 census) for her health, where she had spent time June 1902 and October 1903, and he reportedly attended Philadelphia College of Dentistry for advanced education then settled in Colorado Springs, Colorado where he belonged to the Masonic fraternity and was also a member of the Colorado Springs Golf Club, winning many trophies and reportedly a member of Delta Sig fraternity, associations which indicate something of the nature of his recreation. He belonged to the First Methodist Episcopal church, served on its official board, and was a very earnest and active worker in the church and in the Y M C A. While actuated in his professional career by a laudable ambition, he had never allowed his practice to so dominate his time and interests that he had no opportunity to aid in movements that work for individual uplift and the betterment of the community. On the contrary, he had given much thought and attention to those lines which lead to moral progress and the worth of his work was widely acknowledged by all who know aught of his career. He was for a number of years a teacher in Beth-El Hospital (organized 1904 as Beth, started with Methodist background, renamed Beth-El in 1911, became Memorial Hospital 1943, now Memorial Health System).

Outside of professional interests, his REO (Oldsmobile) was one of the first automobiles in Colorado Springs and he was a Director of the Colorado Springs National Bank in which he held five percent of bank shares that started in 1907. Each share of stock increased to nearly 320 by time bank sold, to 450,000 with par value of $10.00 was sold in 1985 for $100.00 per share (over four billion dollars). The Armstrong family operated an extremely good bank! His friend Willis R Armstrong was pallbearer at both Will and Maude's funerals. (Payment for my bank stock was made by check, via registered mail, dated August 1, 1985, with $79.99 in postage affixed.)

In his political views Dr. Flora was a republican, as was his father, having supported the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. For six years he efficiently served on the Colorado state board of dental examiners and was connected with the Colorado Council of Defense in furthering war work of WW I.

Granddaddy lived long enough to enjoy both daughters attending college and to give their hand in matrimony:

1st)- Harriette Pearl (1893 MO-1973 CO) at home, 2129 North Nevada, to Dr Guy H Hopkins (1894 IL-1966 CO), Wednesday, 8 September 1920, entire family in attendance, including her grandfather John A Flora, of Oswego, Kansas, her uncle Clarence M Flora and his family, from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, her aunt Harriette (Hattie A Flora) Gray, from Omaha, Nebraska, with family (less Carl Jr), plus Guy's family members --- with sister Frances as her attendant and her grandfather's step-grandson, Elmer C Clark, Jr (1893 KS-1969 CO), best man.

2ndly)- Frances Elizabeth (1898 MO-1928 MO), my mother, Sunday, 28 August 1921 at home, 221 East St Vrain Street, to Luke J Boggess (1899 MO-1974 MO), with sister Harriette as matron of honor and Dr Guy H Hopkins best man, only both immediate family members present.

Will and Maude had four grandchildren:

Harriette Hopkins, now of Northridge, California, married, two children), William Hopkins, always of Pueblo, Colorado, married 57+ years, three children, Jack Boggess, buried February 2001 at Portland, Oregon, married 50 years, three children, and me, Bill Boggess now of, never married. Harriette and Ralph celebrated 64th wedding anniversary, 30 June 2007. She is still water-skiing at age 86 in frigid Lake Tahoe from their south shore summer home which they've enjoyed going on forty years after ten years of rentals. William's wife Cay passed away April 2004.

Maude's sister Pearle (Wallick) Jacobs (1872 IN-1930 MN), buried Forest Hill Cemetery, of Duluth, Minnesota visited at both Carthage and Colorado Springs, had one child, son William Albert (1908 MN-1977 CA). Son William once amazed much younger, Pueblo, Colorado cousins, Harriette and William Hopkins by throwing a baseball so high into the air, --- then catching it.

Carl R Gray's step-sister, Grace M Beattie (1872 TN-1954 MS), a teacher, 1902 thru 1944 at Colorado School for the Blind and the Deaf (school started 1874, territorial days, same location since 1876, a few blocks south and west from Beth-El Hospital (Memorial)), was a frequent visitor of Maude's through the years. She, oldest of two daughters with their mother provided nearly a hundred years service to deaf schools in Arkansas, Michigan, Washington, and Colorado.

Granddaddy, as earlier stated, died at daughter Harriette's Pueblo, Colorado home, his obituary failed to mention his father John Andrew, brother Clarence Morton and step-sister Linne C (Smith) Clark. Dr Frederick S McKay, a honorary pallbearer, is credited with starting study which discovered "fluoride" benefiting teeth.

My brother Jack and I, raised in Carthage, Missouri(ah), spent summer of 1936 with grandmother Maude in home where our parents wed 1921 and she died in 1940, both are buried in Colorado Springs' Evergreen Cemetery, he, 12 November 1922, she, 5 August 1940 later, daughter Harriette's husband, Guy Hopkins, 1966, then Harriette, in 1973 joined them. (When, where & why was name "Gualt" added to grandmother's name?)
 


Compiled by: William (Bill) Samuel Boggess (06 Apr 2008
)

Sources:

History of Colorado, by Wilbur Friske Stone.  published by H J Clarke, Chicago,1918 (a partially incorrect bio).

William and Maude marriage : http://files.usgwarchives.net/ks/labette/vitals/marriages/wallick102mr.txt

William Flora obit : http://files.usgwarchives.net/ks/montgomery/obits/f/flora37ob.txt

Maude & Pearle Wallick : http://files.usgwarchives.net/ks/labette/bios/wallick121bs.txt

father's bio : http://files.usgwarchives.net/ks/montgomery/bios/flora112bs.txt